Narrrative life frederivk douglass chapter 1

Retrieved November 19, Worse yet, slavery distorts the bond between father and son, as fathers frequently own their own children and, further, sell their children to other slave owners. For what this separation is done, I do not know, unless it be to hinder the development of the child's affection toward its mother, and to blunt and destroy the natural affection of the mother for the child.

Active Themes Aunt Hester was being whipped by Anthony for spending time with a slave from a nearby plantation, named Ned. This is the inevitable result. Like most slaves, he does not know when he was born, because masters usually try to keep their slaves from knowing their own ages.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Chapter 1

It was the blood-stained gate, the entrance to the hell of slavery, through which I was about to pass. From the outset of the book, Douglass makes it clear that slaves are deprived of characteristics that humanize them, like birthdays.

My mother was named Harriet Bailey. Anthony was a barbarous slave owner, and had a still more barbarous overseer named Plummer.

Retrieved September 29, Why master was so careful of her, may be safely left to conjecture. My first master's name was Anthony.

He deemed all such inquiries on the part of a slave improper and impertinent, and evidence of a restless spirit. I wish I could commit to paper the feelings with which I beheld it.

I have often been awakened at the dawn of day by the most heart-rending shrieks of an own aunt of mine, whom he used to tie up to a joist, and whip upon her naked back till she was literally covered with blood.

Had he been a man of pure morals himself, he might have been thought interested in protecting the innocence of my aunt; but those who knew him will not suspect him of any such virtue.

Active Themes Because of his separation from his mother, and her untimely death, Douglass has no idea who his father is. Ultimately, this fact makes little difference, since slaveholders have prescribed that children of mixed parentage always follow the status of their mothers.

He would at times seem to take great pleas- ure in whipping a slave. Plummer was a miserable drunkard, a profane swearer, and a savage monster.

Aunt Hester had not only disobeyed his orders in going out, but had been found in company with Lloyd's Ned; which circumstance, I found, from what he said while whipping her, was the chief of- fence. She now stood fair for his infernal purpose.

Douglass remembers being unhappy and confused that white children knew their ages, but he was not allowed even to ask his own. Douglass remembers that Hester was very attractive. He then told her to cross her hands, calling her at the same time a d——d b—-h. When Douglass was only an infant, he was separated from his mother, as is commonly done to destroy the bond enslaved children feel towards their mothers.

Aunt Hester went out one night,—where or for what I do not know,—and happened to be absent when my master desired her presence. Master, however, was not a humane slaveholder. She died when I was about seven years old, on one of my master's farms, near Lee's Mill. My mother and I were separated when I was but an infant--before I knew her as my mother.

I do not recollect of ever seeing my mother by the light of day. Why master was so careful of her, may be safely left to conjecture. Douglass is separated from his mother soon after birth—a common practice among slave owners.

He remembers this moment as his introduction into the hellish world of slavery. LitChart as a printable PDF. Douglass recalls feeling like both a witness to and a participant in the abuse the first time he ever saw it.

Active Themes If this mulatto population keeps growing, Douglass observes that slavery will no longer be able to persist under its so-called biblical justification, which states that all descendants of Ham are cursed and deserve enslavement.

He was admitted to be such by all I ever heard speak of my parentage. I never saw my mother, to know her as such, more than four or five times in my life; and each of these times was very short in duration, and at night.

I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and about twelve miles from Easton, in Talbot county, Maryland. I could not tell why I ought to be deprived of the same privilege.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass - Quotes - Chapters STUDY. PLAY Chapter 1 - Douglass reminds reader that the act of watching someone get beat, without intervening could be considered participating in the crime Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass - Quotes - Chapter 15 terms.

Douglass quotes. Home Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass E-Text: Chapter 1 E-Text Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Chapter 1. I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and about twelve miles from Easton, in Talbot county, Maryland.

From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

Welcome to the new SparkNotes! Your book-smartest friend just got a makeover. Douglass ’s mother is named Harriet Bailey, and his father is an unknown white man rumored to be Douglass’s own lanos-clan.com Douglass was only an infant, he was separated from his mother, as is commonly done to destroy the bond enslaved children feel towards their mothers.

Read Chapter 1 of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass.

The text begins: I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and about twelve miles from Easton, in Talbot county, Maryland.

Narrrative life frederivk douglass chapter 1
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SparkNotes: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass